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06 July 2012 @ 09:51 am
It's Kinda Awesome  
Julia Bluhm, who is fourteen, started an online petition to Seventeen magazine, asking them to feature one girl every month who was not Photoshopped to look perfect, who was a healthy weight, and who was altogether normal. She got eighty thousand signatures.

Instead, Seventeen's editor, Ann Shoket, had the entire staff sign an eight-point "Body Peace Treaty," that they not alter shapes and only include images of "real girls and models who are healthy." While this isn't necessarily so for the ads in the magazine, since the advertising agencies are outside the company and therefore not part of the agreement, it's still a huge victory.

Now two other middle-schoolers are talking about taking on Teen Vogue.

It's an issue I feel very strongly about. There are not many women who haven't struggled with body image, even when there's nothing wrong with them. In America, especially, we're at odds with our culture, since we're a food culture, and whether it's conscious or not, the media encourages it; even with television, there is not a single show I can think of where the characters aren't regulars and a certain diner, restaurant, coffee shop, or pool hall (which serves food.) Short order food is fattening, plain and simple, because the way you cook it so fast involves butter and all. And yet, simultaneously we're bombarded with pictures of this skeletons in dresses, and told that's what a beautiful woman looks like.

This is only one example, and I feel that in order to get both our mental and physical country's health concerning body image back under control, we have to actually change an entire culture. And I'm sure it's not just Americans who are negatively affected by these types of images in fashion.

Therefore, I commend those girls who have gone out and made a difference.

As a side note, one of the girl's at work seems to think I'm high strung. Wtf?
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aaa_mazingaaa_mazing on July 6th, 2012 02:08 pm (UTC)
What is high strung?
MissTeacakesmissteacakes on July 6th, 2012 02:20 pm (UTC)
Always stressed out.
aaa_mazingaaa_mazing on July 6th, 2012 02:26 pm (UTC)
Are you? I wouldn't say so.
MissTeacakesmissteacakes on July 6th, 2012 02:29 pm (UTC)
It's cause I don't socialize at work, I concentrate on doing my job. If I keep moving, I don't have time to be annoyed or tired.
aaa_mazingaaa_mazing on July 6th, 2012 02:34 pm (UTC)
Hm. I always separate work from socializing. I come, take papers, and leave for a lecture. Or, and have fights with those who don't understand that all people are different in between.
Alexanderashmedai on July 6th, 2012 02:13 pm (UTC)
And I'm sure it's not just Americans who are negatively affected by these types of images in fashion.

Nope, it's everywhere in the Western world, I think. It makes me furious because we have it so much better than 80% of the world, who really aren't given a choice whether or not to starve.
MissTeacakesmissteacakes on July 6th, 2012 02:24 pm (UTC)
Totally. Even I've looked at myself and thought, "I need to watch my weight more." And I'm a twig. Never mind fighting myself about my face being too round or my calves too big or any other number of things.

I try my hardest to be an advocate of everyone being shaped different, even though it's hard sometimes.
aaa_mazingaaa_mazing on July 6th, 2012 02:30 pm (UTC)
I've stopped fighting with my weight a while ago. I was never a 'twig' and probably will never be. But I'm thirty (okay, thirty one). But what these image makers do to teenage girls is all kinds of wrong.
Alexanderashmedai on July 6th, 2012 04:30 pm (UTC)
I try my hardest to be an advocate of everyone being shaped different, even though it's hard sometimes.

Absolutely. And more heavy-set people can be very attractive, the trick is knowing how to dress.